Dr. Sandhya Singh

Consultant Clinical Dietitian and Nutritionist, Bengaluru-560011, India

http://drsandhyasingh.zest.md

About Me

Dr. Sandhya Singh is a Doctorate in Nutrition, having 15 years experience in Hospital Industry. She is an expert in Clinical Nutrition and Detetics which involves nutritional management of patients as per their disease condition, like Diabetes, Heart diseases, Kidney diseases, Post surgical dietary management.  She also has vast experience in the field of Weight loss, Weight management, Food allergies and Intensive dietary management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus(GDM) in pregnant women.  She started her career in Mallya Hospital as a Clinical Dietitian and Diabetes Educator , worked as a lifestyle counsellor and Dietitian wtih Lifetime Wellness Rx International Limited as a lifestyle counsellor,  worked as a Sr. Clinical Dietitian  in Apollo Hospitals, a multispeciality hospital and worked as Head, Clinical Dietitian in Apollo Speciality Hospital, Bangalore.

She has obtained Doctorate in Nutrition from Mysore University, and worked extensively on GDM women, her future prospects focus towards providing the most advanced and scientifically proven diet therapy for weight loss, disease management and lifestyle modification, specifically Obesity, Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

Dr Singh has published papers in various national and international journals.  She has been participating in various conferences, presenting papers and posters.  She conducts lifestyle modification programs in corporate companies.

My Blogs

  • 300x200
    DIETARY FIBER- Is Oat meal rich in fiber? Will it reduce serum cholesterol levels?

    By: Sandhya Singh

    Dietary Fiber - Soluble and insoluble fiber are the two types found in food items. Soluble fiber is acted upon by the normal bacteria in your intestines. Insoluble fiber is not digested by the body and promotes regularity and softens stools. Wheat bran, whole grain products and vegetables are good sources of insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber reduces body's absorption of cholesterol from the intestines. Oatmeal contains soluble fiber that reduces your low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the "bad" cholesterol that can increase your risk of heart attacks and strokes. This type of fiber is also found in such foods as kidney beans, brussels sprouts, apples, pears, barley and prunes.   The American Dietetic Association recommends a healthy diet include 25 to 35 grams of fiber a day, including both soluble and insoluble fiber. (Soluble fiber should make up 5 to 10 grams of your fiber intake.)    Uses Oats is eaten raw with milk and sugar and with raisins and other dry fruits added to it.  It is eaten as porridge.  Rolled oats are often used as a key ingredient in granola breakfast cereals (in which toasted oats are blended with sugar and/or nuts and raisins) and granola bars. Benefits of using Oats Daily consumption of a bowl of oatmeal can Lower blood cholesterol,  beta-glucan content and reduces the risk of heart disease when combined with a low-fat diet. Complex carbohydrates and water-soluble fibre that encourages slow digestion and stabilizes blood-glucose levels. It contains more B complex vitamins as compared with other grains. Recipe for Oats Rotis(low glycemic index, good for blood glucose control in diabetics)   Ingredients Wheat flour - 3 fistful Oats - 2 fistful   Salt - As needed (or 1/2 tsp)  Hot water - As needed (not boiling/smoking hot; just a little above bearable heat) Method of Preparation Take a wide bowl and add flour, oats and salt. Mix well with your fingers or a whisk.  Then pour a few tablespoons of hot water and rub well using your fingers.  Add water gradually and make a dough. Knead well for a few more minutes and leave aside for 15 to 30 minutes (the longer you leave the dough to rest, the softer your rotis will be). Take the dough and knead it well and separate them into 3 or 4 balls and smoothen them by rolling between your palms.  Take a chapati board and place one ball over it, flatten gently and roll into rotis using a rolling pin. The rotis should not be too thin not too thick. Then place a pan on flame and place the roti on it and cook on high flame until you can see some brown spots. Cook until brown on both sides. Remove from pan and place the roti over direct flame, allow  it to puff up just like phulkas.  Remove from flame and serve it will dal or a vegetable accompaniment.  

    Read More

  • 300x200
    Are we using the right amount of salt? What if I don't reduce the salt content in my food?

    By: Sandhya Singh

    The scientific name of salt is "Sodium Choloride"(Nacl) . The American Heart Association recommends no more than 2,300 milligrams (mgs) a day and an ideal limit of no more than 1,500 mg per day for most adults. Additional salt generally come from processed food, pre-packaged food, restaurant food and the extra salt that is consumed on the table from the salt shaker. What is the sodium content in the table salt(sodium chloride (NaCl), that we use in cooking on a daily basis. Here are the approximate amounts of sodium in a given amount of table salt: 1/4 teaspoon salt = 575 mg sodium 1/2 teaspoon salt = 1,150 mg sodium 3/4 teaspoon salt = 1,725 mg sodium 1 teaspoon salt = 2,300 mg sodium Low Sodium content in the diet is part of the overall heart-healthy eating pattern that the American Heart Association recommends. It emphasizes fruits, vegetables and whole grains, while including low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish and nuts, and limiting red meat, sweets and sugar-sweetened beverages. Following this pattern should help you limit not only the sodium you eat but also the saturated fat andtrans fat you eat. The guideline to reduce to 1,500 mg is not the recommendation to people who lose big amounts of sodium in sweat, like competitive athletes, and workers exposed to major heat stress, such as foundry workers and fire fighters.  Due to medical conditions or other special dietary needs or restrictions are imposed, then follow the advice of a qualified healthcare practitioner. How can I tell how much sodium I'm eating? You can find the amount of sodium in your food by looking at the Nutrition Facts label. The amount of sodium per serving is listed in milligrams, abbreviated %u201Cmg.%u201D Check the ingredient list for words like sodium, salt and soda. The total sodium shown on the Nutrition Facts label includes the sodium from salt, plus the sodium from any other sodium-containing ingredient in the product (for example, ingredients like sodium nitrate, sodium citrate, monosodium glutamate [MSG], or sodium benzoate). The body needs only a small amount of sodium (less than 500 milligrams per day) to function properly. Consequences of excess salt consumption Evidence has shown that a number of health conditions are caused by, or exacerbated by, a high salt diet. Strongest evidence is for the effect that a high salt diet has on blood pressure, stroke and heart disease, there is also a wide body of evidence indicating a link between salt consumption and other conditions.   Salt is associated with: High Blood Pressure Cardiovascular Disease (stroke, heart disease and heart failure) Kidney Disease & Kidney Stones Obesity Osteoporosis Stomach Cancer Water retention/bloating Salt is also thought to exacerbate the symptoms of: Diabetes Meniere's Disease Asthma Alzheimer's. Are we Indian consuming excess Salt? The answer is 'YES'' our Indian cuisine in general, has excess salt. Indian cuisine has a heavy load of spices, the spice levels in our food masks the effect of salt. We Indians have excess salt in our food and our taste buds are tuned that way. It is very easy to accustom our taste buds to less salt in the diet, generally it takes about 3 weeks. Excessive salt containing Indian food items: Pickles, chutneys, sauces and ketchups, papads, chips and salted biscuits, savoury items, cheese and salted butter, canned foods (vegetables, dals & meats), bakery products, ready made soup powders, dried salted fish, Chinese food, salted nuts etc. Butter and ghee are both high in salt and fat. Cut these out of your cooking by replacing them with olive or rapseed oil, or use unsalted versions.   A reduction in salt consumption even by 1g in diet daily may help decrease the incidences of death, say University of California-San Francisco researchers at the American Heart Association's 49th Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention.   How to reduce salt in your food:   Check nutritional information on food labels before you buy a product. Check for the amount of salt (sodium, Na), monosodium glutamate (MSG), baking soda or soda (sodium bicarbonate), baking powder, sodium benzoate, sodium sulfite, sodium nitrite, etc. present in the product, mentioned on the food label. Low sodium/salt: Less than 120mg sodium/100g of food or not more than half the sodium content of the regular food (whichever is less). Reduced sodium/salt: Up to 75% of the sodium content of the regular food. Lightly salted: At least 90mg sodium/100g of food less than regular food and less than 600mg of sodium/100g. Do not keep salt shaker on the dining table. Choose fruits and vegetables as snacks, rather than salty snack foods. Choose fresh, frozen or canned food items without added salts or of reduced salt variety. There are many products available with reduced levels of salt or with no added salt. Select unsalted nuts or seeds. Eat less salty foods like chips, salted nuts, salty cheeses, soy sauce, pickles, Bikaneri bhujia, chicken broth, processed meat and fish. Buy fresh vegetables, instead of frozen or canned veggies. Select fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt and cheese with low sodium. Add spices, herb, garlic and lemon juice in cooking instead of salt to enhance the taste and flavor of your food. Use only half the amount of salt recommended in a recipe. Reduce eating pickles and buy ready to eat meals with reduced salt. Do not buy packaged foods that contain more than 120mg of sodium per serving. Avoid using sauces, such as mayonnaise and ketchup, as these are often high in salt.

    Read More